Motorola Stream Wireless Earbuds Launched With Charging Case

Motorola has launched its new Stream wireless in-ear headphones, making them available first in the UK at GBP 79.99 (roughly Rs. 6,650). Notably, unlike most other wireless audio headphones on the market, the new earbuds from Motorola are truly wireless and not even connected to each other with a wire. The Stream wireless earbuds have only been introduced in the UK as of now, and are in fact made by Motorola brand licensee, Binatone.

The Motorola Stream wireless earbuds feature IP54 sweat and water resistance, so users can use these earbuds at the gym, while running, or doing other form of exercises. The wireless in-ear headphones come with a bundled storage case that can also charge the earpieces while on the go. While the earbuds offer 2 hours of battery life with Bluetooth connectivity, with the storage case, they offer a maximum of up to six hours of battery life.

motorola wireless earbuds story2 Motorola Wireless Earbuds 2The Stream wireless in-ear headphones feature a 6mm driver and can be used to place and receive calls. Users can also make use of voice commands as the new wireless earphones are compatible with both Google Now and Siri. There are three ear-bud sizes that will come along with the pair of headphones so that users of all age and sizes are able to wear them comfortably.

While the Motorola Stream wireless earbuds are exclusively available through Argos in the UK but the company has said that they will be made available for customers in the US within a month’s time, as per a report by The Verge.

Motorola Granted Patent for a Smartphone Display That Repairs Itself

Lenovo’s Moto brand has previously provided smartphones that have ‘shatterproof’ displays but it seems like the company is now ready to take things a notch higher. Motorola Mobility has now filed a patent for a screen that is capable of healing itself after getting deformed, at least to certain degree, as per the documents that were spotted on the Patent and Trademark Office website of the US.

As per the documents, spotted by The Verge, Motorola has explained that using a heating effect, the proposed smartphone will be able to repair the damage partially in the affected area after identifying the cracks on its own, as per the report. In its documents, Motorola has mentioned “shape memory polymer” to make the screen, which can essentially come back to its original condition after being deformed by simply applying some heat.

Motorola Granted Patent for a Smartphone Display That Repairs ItselfThe user can reportedly use their body heat to get the screen to its original shape as well. Considering that this is just a patent filing, you can almost be sure that we are not very close to seeing these kinds of displays on smartphones soon. There is also a possibility that Lenovo might ditch this concept altogether and move onto a different technology.

Despite all the aforementioned factors, there is no doubt that this kind of a screen will save users from the cost of screen protectors and cases and will certainly help those of us who drop our phones from time to time.

Motorola Moto E4 Plus

Image result for Motorola Moto E4 PlusThe Motorola Moto E4 Plus is expected to be powered by 1.3GHz quad-core MediaTek MT6737M processor and come with 2GB of RAM. The phone is rumoured to pack 16GB of internal storage that can be expanded up to GB via a microSD card. As far as the cameras are concerned, the Motorola Moto E4 Plus is rumoured to pack a 13-megapixel primary camera on the rear and a 5-megapixel front shooter for selfies.

The Motorola Moto E4 Plus is rumoured to run Android 7.1.1 and be powered by a 5000mAh non removable battery.

The Motorola Moto E4 Plus tipped to be a single SIM (GSM) . Connectivity options are said to include Wi-Fi, GPS, Bluetooth, NFC, Headphones, 3G and 4G.

Motorola Moto C

Moto CThe Motorola Moto C is powered by 1.1GHz quad-core MediaTek MT6737M processor and it comes with 1GB of RAM. The phone packs 8GB of internal storage that can be expanded up to 32GB via a microSD card. As far as the cameras are concerned, the Motorola Moto C packs a 5-megapixel primary camera on the rear and a 2-megapixel front shooter for selfies.

The Motorola Moto C runs Android 7.0 and is powered by a 2350mAh removable battery. It measures 145.50 x 73.60 x 9.00 (height x width x thickness) and weigh 154.00 grams.

The Motorola Moto C is a single SIM (GSM) smartphone that accepts a Micro-SIM. Connectivity options include Wi-Fi, GPS, Bluetooth, Headphones, FM and 3G. Sensors on the phone include Accelerometer.

Motorola Moto C Plus

Moto C PlusMotorola Moto C Plus detailed specifications
GENERAL
Release date May 2017
Form factor Touchscreen
Dimensions (mm) 144.00 x 72.30 x 10.00
Weight (g) 162.00
Battery capacity (mAh) 4000
Removable battery Yes
Colours Metallic Cherry, Pearl White, Fine Gold, Starry Black
SAR value NA
DISPLAY
Screen size (inches) 5.00
Touchscreen Yes
Resolution 720×1280 pixels
Pixels per inch (PPI) 294
HARDWARE
Processor 1.3GHz quad-core
Processor make MediaTek MT6737
RAM 2GB
Internal storage 16GB
Expandable storage Yes
Expandable storage type microSD
Expandable storage up to (GB) 32
CAMERA
Rear camera 8-megapixel
Flash Yes
Front camera 2-megapixel
SOFTWARE
Operating System Android 7.0
CONNECTIVITY
Wi-Fi Yes
Wi-Fi standards supported 802.11 b/g/n
GPS Yes
Bluetooth Yes, v 4.20
NFC No
Infrared No
USB OTG No
Headphones Yes
FM Yes
Number of SIMs 1
SIM 1
SIM Type Micro-SIM
GSM/CDMA GSM
3G Yes
4G/ LTE No
Supports 4G in India (Band 40) No
SENSORS
Compass/ Magnetometer No
Proximity sensor No
Accelerometer Yes
Ambient light sensor No
Gyroscope No
Barometer No
Temperature sensor No

Motorola is aggressively trying to court phone buyers with old ideas and new tricks.

Image result for Motorola is aggressively trying to court phone buyers with old ideas and new tricks.By Motorola’s own admission, it wasn’t in a great spot just a year ago. Its third-generation Moto X line hadn’t sold quite as well as previous years despite enormous technical improvements, and the integration into newish owner Lenovo had been hitting some bumps.

Chief among them was how to integrate Motorola’s brand equity and enormous technical mastery into Lenovo’s sprawling worldwide distribution network. Would Motorola be subsumed into Lenovo, leaving just remnants of the world-renowned phone maker, or would Lenovo let Motorola stand on its own, as previous owner Google managed to do.

Motorola: We would’ve caught Samsung’s Note 7 battery flaw

Image result for Motorola: We would've caught Samsung's Note 7 battery flaw

Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7 sent the wireless industry into a frenzy when the phones started catching fire.

Samsung itself recalled and scrapped the phones, and many other companies started looking into their own manufacturing processes. But at least one phone maker held firm with the processes it already had in place.

“Absolutely not,” said Motorola’s Russ Gyenes when asked whether his company made any changes after the Note 7 problem flared up. Gyenes, an engineer who focuses on batteries, was speaking to a group of journalists on Tuesday.

While Samsung has largely repaired its image with the launch of the Galaxy S8, the potentially volatile nature of battery technology remains an issue. The Note 7 incident put a spotlight on how companies in all industries ensure the safety of the batteries in their devices. Samsung, for instance, introduced an eight-point battery check that it shared with the industry in hopes of raising standards everywhere.

When asked about Samsung’s test, Gyenes smirked.

“I looked at that eight-point check,” he said. “Why weren’t they doing it before?”

What I saw inside Samsung’s battery testing center

CNET senior reporter Shara Tibken visits Samsung headquarters in South Korea to see firsthand how the company has stepped up its battery testing after the disastrous Note 7 fires. She also gets an early look at the new Galaxy S

 His comments are bold for any company, even one whose legacy in dealing with battery technology goes back to the invention of the first cell phone. Hoverboards, e-cigarettes, electric cars and computer batteries have shown at least isolated instances of batteries catching fire. Boeing fielded questions about the safety of lithium-ion batteries for its 787 Dreamliner. Gyenes noted that Motorola testified as an expert in those proceedings.

The discussion was part of a broader campaign to get Motorola — a historic brand in the wireless world that fell on hard times with the rise of the iPhone — back into the public consciousness with a new brand strategy and phones like the Moto Z.

Motorola Says It Would Have Noticed The Note 7 Battery Issue

Image result for Motorola Says It Would Have Noticed The Note 7 Battery Issue

Motorola says it would have noticed the Note 7 battery issue at an early stage. It’s a statement that’s part propping up their own internal process for battery testing and perhaps part shining the spotlight on Samsung’s previous process that was in place before the Galaxy Note 7 devices reportedly started catching fire, which caused Samsung to recall all devices and stop selling it before moving to a new eight-point safety check to ensure that batteries would be safe for all future devices.

While no one can dispute that Samsung has taken the issues with the Galaxy Note 7 very seriously and that it certainly cares about the safety of its customers, Motorola’s Russ Gyenes has reportedly questioned why Samsung wasn’t doing the eight-point safety check before. This was in response to being asked about the new testing methods. Gyenes also stated that Motorola hasn’t made any changes to its own testing after Samsung’s issues with the Galaxy Note 7 caused it to change how it tests batteries and devices. This is an interesting detail when you consider that other companies began to look into their own processes for manufacturing following the Galaxy Note 7 problems, as they wanted to be sure that no issues arose.

 As for why Gyenes is so confident that Motorola would have been able to catch these issues before they became a problem for consumers, it boils down to when Motorola begins looking for battery defects. According to Gyenes, Motorola starts this process before batteries are mass produced, looking at batteries from the individual cell construction level. On top of this, Motorola makes its battery manufacturer partners pass an audit that contains a total of 118 different questions on it and there’s no room for error, as Motorola doesn’t allow a passing grade on this audit unless all questions are correct. Even if Gyenes’ statements are bold, they’re not necessarily unfounded. They raise good questions about companies being vigilant with making product safety more of a priority, something which Motorola is highlighting that its already been doing, but what Samsung is also doing with its own products now with a higher standard than before.

Motorola says it would have noticed the Note 7 battery issue at an early stage. It’s a statement that’s part propping up their own internal process for battery testing and perhaps part shining the spotlight on Samsung’s previous process that was in place before the Galaxy Note 7 devices reportedly started catching fire, which caused Samsung to recall all devices and stop selling it before moving to a new eight-point safety check to ensure that batteries would be safe for all future devices.

While no one can dispute that Samsung has taken the issues with the Galaxy Note 7 very seriously and that it certainly cares about the safety of its customers, Motorola’s Russ Gyenes has reportedly questioned why Samsung wasn’t doing the eight-point safety check before. This was in response to being asked about the new testing methods. Gyenes also stated that Motorola hasn’t made any changes to its own testing after Samsung’s issues with the Galaxy Note 7 caused it to change how it tests batteries and devices. This is an interesting detail when you consider that other companies began to look into their own processes for manufacturing following the Galaxy Note 7 problems, as they wanted to be sure that no issues arose.

As for why Gyenes is so confident that Motorola would have been able to catch these issues before they became a problem for consumers, it boils down to when Motorola begins looking for battery defects. According to Gyenes, Motorola starts this process before batteries are mass produced, looking at batteries from the individual cell construction level. On top of this, Motorola makes its battery manufacturer partners pass an audit that contains a total of 118 different questions on it and there’s no room for error, as Motorola doesn’t allow a passing grade on this audit unless all questions are correct. Even if Gyenes’ statements are bold, they’re not necessarily unfounded. They raise good questions about companies being vigilant with making product safety more of a priority, something which Motorola is highlighting that its already been doing, but what Samsung is also doing with its own products now with a higher standard than before.

Motorola says it would have noticed the Note 7 battery issue at an early stage. It’s a statement that’s part propping up their own internal process for battery testing and perhaps part shining the spotlight on Samsung’s previous process that was in place before the Galaxy Note 7 devices reportedly started catching fire, which caused Samsung to recall all devices and stop selling it before moving to a new eight-point safety check to ensure that batteries would be safe for all future devices.

While no one can dispute that Samsung has taken the issues with the Galaxy Note 7 very seriously and that it certainly cares about the safety of its customers, Motorola’s Russ Gyenes has reportedly questioned why Samsung wasn’t doing the eight-point safety check before. This was in response to being asked about the new testing methods. Gyenes also stated that Motorola hasn’t made any changes to its own testing after Samsung’s issues with the Galaxy Note 7 caused it to change how it tests batteries and devices. This is an interesting detail when you consider that other companies began to look into their own processes for manufacturing following the Galaxy Note 7 problems, as they wanted to be sure that no issues arose.

 As for why Gyenes is so confident that Motorola would have been able to catch these issues before they became a problem for consumers, it boils down to when Motorola begins looking for battery defects. According to Gyenes, Motorola starts this process before batteries are mass produced, looking at batteries from the individual cell construction level. On top of this, Motorola makes its battery manufacturer partners pass an audit that contains a total of 118 different questions on it and there’s no room for error, as Motorola doesn’t allow a passing grade on this audit unless all questions are correct. Even if Gyenes’ statements are bold, they’re not necessarily unfounded. They raise good questions about companies being vigilant with making product safety more of a priority, something which Motorola is highlighting that its already been doing, but what Samsung is also doing with its own products now with a higher standard than before.

Motorola’s first phone with dual rear cameras is the Moto G5S Plus

Moto G5S PlusMotorola is bringing dual rear cameras to the mid-range segment.

It looks like dual rear cameras will be the defining trend this year. We’ve already seen Xiaomi roll out the feature in the Mi 6, and OnePlus is rumored to offer a dual-camera setup in the OnePlus 5. Motorola is jumping on the bandwagon, with the Moto G5S Plus set to become the first phone from the manufacturer to sport two cameras at the back.

Leaked renders by Gear India reveal a desing that’s identical to what we’ve seen yesterday with the Moto G5S, albeit with two cameras at the back. We don’t know if Motorola will resort to a similar implementation as Huawei — offering a monochrome sensor paired with an RGB lens — or if it’ll use the secondary sensor as a telephoto lens like the Mi 6.

The Moto G5S Plus is said to offer a 5.5-inch Full HD display, and an all-metallic chassis that will be available in three color options — grey, gold, and silver. It looks like that blue variant is limited to the Moto G5S. There’s no information on the rest of the hardware, but it is likely Motorola will retain the Snapdragon 625, or switch to the newer Snapdragon 626 chipset. The addition of dual cameras is certainly an interesting move, but it will undoubtedly raise the cost of the phone.

Moto G5S Plus

The standard Moto G5 Plus with 4GB of RAM and 64GB storage retails for $299, and a variant of the G5S Plus with the same configuration could easily run up to $350, awfully close to the $400 price point of the Moto Z Play.

The G5S Plus won’t be the only Motorola handset with dual rear cameras, as a Moto Z2 Force leak from last week showed off two cameras at the back. With seven phones yet to launch, Motorola’s lineup is about to get very crowded.

Motorola’s David Schuster Says Android 5.1 Soak Test For 1st And 2nd Gen Moto X Is Expanding, Full Release Could Come Next Week

MX

Motorola announced the Android 5.1 update for both Moto X devices a few weeks ago, but it started out as a very slow soak test. Motorola’s David Schuster says that today that test is expanding to more countries with a full release coming as soon as next week.

ccording to Schuster, the 2nd gen Moto X soak is rolling out in Australia, Belgium, Denmark, Greece, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Italy, Malaysia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Philippines, Poland, Singapore, and Sweden. The 1st gen Moto X is getting the 5.1 soak in Belgium, Italy, Netherlands, Spain, Australia, Hong Kong, India, Kuwait, Malaysia, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, and United Arab Emirates.

If nothing breaks, the update should be made available to everyone next week. The OTA has been floating around since it started appearing earlier this month, so you can probably find it and sideload if you just can’t wait any longer. This will probably be the final build—Motorola must be feeling confident to start sending it out to this many markets.