Avoid processed food, ditch hot beverages for healthy teeth

Sensitivity and trouble in jaw/teeth is a common thing during monsoon season. Avoid having steaming hot food or beverages and floss regularly, say experts.

Romsha Vashishth, Consultant, Oro-Dental Surgeon and Implantologist at Columbia Asia Hospital and Aarti Bhasin, Consultant Dentist at Prive Skin & Wellness Clinic have listed few tips:

* Follow a oral hygiene routine: Brush your teeth twice a day and use desensitize toothpaste to avoid sensitive teeth which is a common problem in the monsoon season.

Reduce intake of added sugars, preservatives and processed foods: Since every sip or bite is an acid attack it has too many micro-organisms.

Replace old or worn toothbrushes: If your toothbrush is older than 2 months, it’s about time to get a new one. Other signs of replacement are worn or frayed bristles as these won’t clean every nook and corner of your teeth leaving them unclean and unhealthy.

Nutritionally positive and season rich Diet: One should eat all the fresh fruits and fruits which are available during the monsoon season. Drink soups, eat almonds, corns and strawberries.

Use of antioxidants and vitamin c rich foods / supplements: To avoid bleeding of gums, eat as many fruits like pineapple and cucumber to keep your gums healthy.

Use of Mouth guard: To avoid Oral Injury, kids should use this when going out in the playing areas.
Care for Kids- Every sugary sports drink add to acid attacks in every sip of it. Substitute it with coconut water, fresh juice and drink water.

teeth, tips for healthy teeth, oral hygiene, dentist, healthCleaning your tongue: As this helps in removing the bad breath and the bacterial problems in the mouth one should clean the tongue daily.

Use of non-alcoholic mouthwash: For fresh breath and to maintain the pH of the saliva, mouthwash is the best.

Avoid hot sips: Rains increase the cravings for Tea, hot fried foods, hot soup. Tooth sensitivity is caused by the stimulation of cells within these tubes, causing a short, sharp pain when the area is exposed to hot or cold temperatures through food and beverages. Avoid having steaming hot food or beverages.

Avoid caffeine: Rain is a perfect excuse of another cup of hot coffee. Coffee helps the bacteria in your mouth to create acids that can lead to tooth and enamel erosion. This can cause your teeth to become thin and brittle. Coffee can also cause bad breath.

Visit a doctor: Make an immediate appointment visit a doctor if have any tooth ache.

Diet tips: The right food habits during monsoon

Rainy Season is when chances of stomach infection can increase due to faulty eating habits. One can reduce the chances of such health complications easily by making a few alterations to their daily diet, says experts.

Mehar Rajput, Nutritionist and Dietitian at FITPASS, and Aditi Sharma, Chief Dietitian at Columbia Asia Hospital, Ghaziabad, dole out tips on how one can take care of infection:

* Include garlic, pepper, ginger, asafoetida, jeera powder, turmeric and coriander in food as it help enhance digestion and improve immunity.

* Should prefer boiled water during rainy season because germs are present in water. Have medium to low salt food and avoid heavy salty food as they are responsible for high blood pressure, promoting bloating and water retention.

* Non-vegetarians should go in for lighter meat preparations like stew and soups. But be careful about the fish and prawns. Avoid too much of fish and meat this season with heavy curries.

Food habits news, health and food habits, food habits of healthy people, India news, national news, latest news, India news, latest news* Include warm dal or soup in your diet. Add spices like turmeric, clove, black pepper and sauf in it.

* Consuming hot soups during monsoon can reduce inflammation and help fight infection.

* Avoid taking food and vegetables in raw form. Like raw sprouts, they can cause indigestion and lead to gastric problems.

* Turmeric is not only a great antibiotic but is also known to have anti-inflammatory and healing properties which can really help in reducing inflammation in the digestive system.

* Sauf water can be consumed after every meal in order to help you digest food and reduce the chances of gastric problems.

Marijuana ups risk of death from hypertension

Marijuana use is associated with a three-fold risk of death from hypertension, warns new research. “We found that marijuana users had a greater than three-fold risk of death from hypertension and the risk increased with each additional year of use,” said lead study author Barbara Yankey, a PhD student in the School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, US.

The researchers designed a retrospective follow-up study of the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants aged 20 years and above. In 2005-2006, participants were asked if they had ever used marijuana. Those who answered “yes” were considered marijuana users.

Participants reported the age when they first tried marijuana and this was subtracted from their current age to calculate the duration of use. Information on marijuana use was merged with mortality data in 2011 from the National Centre for Health Statistics.

Among a total of 1,213 participants, marijuana users had a higher risk of dying from hypertension, according to the findings published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

Marijuana, Marijuana health risks, risk to health from Marijuana, Marijuana news, latest news, India news, National news, latest news Compared to non-users, marijuana users had a 3.42 times higher risk of death from hypertension. “Our results suggest a possible risk of hypertension mortality from marijuana use. This is not surprising since marijuana is known to have a number of effects on the cardiovascular system,” Yankey said.

Marijuana stimulates the sympathetic nervous system, leading to increases in heart rate, blood pressure and oxygen demand. Emergency rooms have reported cases of angina and heart attacks after marijuana use,” Yankey pointed out.

The cardiovascular risk associated with marijuana use may be greater than the cardiovascular risk already established for cigarette smoking, the researchers said.

“We found higher estimated cardiovascular risks associated with marijuana use than cigarette smoking,” Yankey added.

Men in manufacturing, women nurses at arthritis risk: Study

Men in the manufacturing sector and women who work as nurses are more at risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis than people in other professions, a research has showed.

The findings showed that within the manufacturing sector, male electrical and electronics workers and material handling operators had a two-fold increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis than men in professional, administrative and technical sectors.

Bricklayers and concrete workers had a three-fold increased risk.

On the other hand, for women working in the manufacturing sector, no increase in the risk of arthritis was observed, which might be explained by the relatively small number of women who work in this sector compared to men, the researchers said.

“Our findings indicate that work-related factors, such as airborne harmful exposures, may contribute to disease development,” said Anna Ilar, of the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden.

health News, Men in manufacturing, women nurses, risk of arthritis, Meidcal research news, world news, international medical research newsPotential suspects include silica, asbestos, organic solvents, and motor exhaust, the research showed.

“It is important that findings on preventable risk factors are spread to employees, employers, and decision-makers in order to prevent disease by reducing or eliminating known risk factors,” she added, in the paper appearing in the journal Arthritis Care & Research.

For the study, the team analysed information from 3,522 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and 5,580 controls.

The study gathered information on environmental, genetic, and immunological factors collected from blood samples and questionnaires between 1996 and 2014.

The researchers’ analyses took into account participants’ smoking habits, alcohol use, educational level, and body mass index, all of which are factors associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

Poor kidney function may up irregular heartbeat risk

People with severe kidney disease may be at a two-fold higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation — an irregular heartbeat condition, researchers, led by one of Indian-origin, have suggested. Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia in the general population, and it is especially high in patients with kidney failure.

In patients with the lowest kidney function or the greatest amount of proteinuria — the presence of excess proteins in the urine as well as a sign of kidney damage — the risk for developing atrial fibrillation was approximately two-fold higher compared with those without kidney disease.

“This study found that even modest abnormalities in kidney function were linked with a higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation later in life,” said Nisha Bansal, assistant professor at the University of Washington.

Poor kidney function, Kidney Function, Kidney, Heart, Heartbeat Risk, Heartbeat, Lifestyle News, Latest Lifestyle News, Indian Express, Indian Express News“Atrial fibrillation may affect the selection of cardiovascular therapies and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. Thus, an understanding of the risk of atrial fibrillation across a broad range of kidney function is important,” she added.

For the study, the team analysed 16,769 community-dwelling individuals without atrial fibrillation. There was a step-wise increase in the risk of incident atrial fibrillation with decreasing kidney function.

The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN), suggest that individuals with poor kidney function may benefit from preventive interventions to maintain a normal heart rhythm.

More potent, safer Zika vaccine developed

Scientists have developed the world’s first plant-based Zika vaccine that may be more effective, safer and cheaper than other vaccines against the mosquito-borne virus. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines or therapeutics available to combat Zika, researchers said. The vaccine developed by researchers from Arizona State University (ASU) in the US works against a part of a Zika viral protein, called DIII, that plays a key role for the virus to infect people.

“All flaviviruses have the envelope protein on the outside part of the virus. It has three domains,” said Qiang Chen, a scientist at ASU.

“The domain III has a unique stretch of DNA for the Zika virus, and we exploited this to generate a robust and protective immune response that is unique for Zika,” said Chen, who led the research published in the journal Scientific Reports.

The researchers first grew the envelope protein in bacteria, then prepared the DIII protein domain in tobacco plants.

Zika Virus, Zika Vaccine, Zike cure, ZikaThe team then performed immunisation experiments in mice, which induced antibody and cellular immune responses that have been shown to confer 100 per cent protection against multiple Zika virus strains in mice. The team’s protein-based vaccine uses the smallest and most unique part of the Zika virus that can still elicit a potent and robust immune response.

“In our approach, we make what we call a pseudovirus. It is a fake virus. The pseudovirus displays only the DIII part of the envelope protein on the surface,” said Chen.

“We did a test to make sure that the vaccine produces a potent protective immune response, but also, that it does not produce antibodies that may be cross reactive for dengue, West Nile, yellow fever or others,” he said.

The worldwide Zika threat first emerged in 2015, infecting millions as it swept across the Americas. It struck great fear in pregnant women, as babies born with severe brain birth defects quickly overburdened hospitals and public health care systems.

Potential stem cell therapy may help promote hair growth

Scientists have discovered a new way to activate the stem cells in the hair follicle, an advance that may pave the way for novel drugs to promote hair growth. Hair follicle stem cells are long-lived cells in the hair follicle; they are present in the skin and produce hair throughout a person’s lifetime. They are “quiescent,” meaning they are normally inactive, but they quickly activate during a new hair cycle, which is when new hair growth occurs.

The quiescence of hair follicle stem cells is regulated by many factors. In certain cases they fail to activate, which is what causes hair loss.

Researchers from University of California, Los Angeles in the US found that hair follicle stem cell metabolism is different from other cells of the skin. Cellular metabolism involves the breakdown of the nutrients needed for cells to divide, make energy and respond to their environment. The process of metabolism uses enzymes that alter these nutrients to produce “metabolites.”

As hair follicle stem cells consume the nutrient glucose – a form of sugar – from the bloodstream, they process the glucose to eventually produce a metabolite called pyruvate. The cells then can either send pyruvate to their mitochondria – the part of the cell that creates energy – or can convert pyruvate into another metabolite called lactate. “Our observations about hair follicle stem cell metabolism prompted us to examine whether genetically diminishing the entry of pyruvate into the mitochondria would force hair follicle stem cells to make more lactate, and if that would activate the cells and grow hair more quickly,” said Heather Christofk, an associate professor at UCLA.

The research team first blocked the production of lactate genetically in mice and showed that this prevented hair follicle stem cell activation. Conversely, they increased lactate production genetically in the mice and this accelerated hair follicle stem cell activation, increasing the hair cycle. “Before this, no one knew that increasing or decreasing the lactate would have an effect on hair follicle stem cells,” said William Lowry, a professor at the UCLA.

“Once we saw how altering lactate production in the mice influenced hair growth, it led us to look for potential drugs that could be applied to the skin and have the same effect,” said Lowry. The team identified two drugs that, when applied to the skin of mice, influenced hair follicle stem cells in distinct ways to promote lactate production.

hair loss, stop hair loss, stem cells and hair lossThe first drug, called RCGD423, activates a cellular signalling pathway called JAK-Stat, which transmits information from outside the cell to the nucleus of the cell. The research showed that JAK-Stat activation leads to the increased production of lactate and this in turn drives hair follicle stem cell activation and quicker hair growth. The other drug, called UK5099, blocks pyruvate from entering the mitochondria, which forces the production of lactate in the hair follicle stem cells and accelerates hair growth in mice.

“Through this study, we gained a lot of interesting insight into new ways to activate stem cells,” said Aimee Flores, first author of the study published in the journal Nature Cell Biology. “The idea of using drugs to stimulate hair growth through hair follicle stem cells is very promising given how many millions of people, both men and women, deal with hair loss,” said Flores.

“I think we’ve only just begun to understand the critical role metabolism plays in hair growth and stem cells in general; I’m looking forward to the potential application of these new findings for hair loss and beyond,” she said.

Marijuana use may up death risk of from hypertension

Marijuana use may increase the risk of death from hypertension by three times, a study has warned. “Steps are being taken towards legalisation and decriminalisation of marijuana in the US, and rates of recreational marijuana use may increase substantially as a result,” said Barbara A Yankey, a PhD student at the Georgia State University in the US.

“However, there is little research on the impact of marijuana use on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular mortality,” said Yankey, lead author of the study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. Researchers took data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) of participants aged 20 years and above.

In 2005-2006, participants were asked if they had ever used marijuana. Those who answered “yes” were considered marijuana users. Participants reported the age when they first tried marijuana and this was subtracted from their current age to calculate the duration of use. Information on marijuana use was merged with mortality data in 2011 from the US National Centre for Health Statistics. The researchers estimated the associations of marijuana use, and duration of use, with death from hypertension, heart disease, and cerebrovascular disease, controlling for cigarette use and demographic variables including sex, age, and ethnicity.

marijuana BP, marijuana health, marijuana smoking health impact, marijuana  death, hypertensionDeath from hypertension included multiple causes such as primary hypertension and hypertensive renal disease. Among a total of 1,213 participants, 34 per cent used neither marijuana nor cigarettes, 21 per cent used only marijuana, 20 per cent used marijuana and smoked cigarettes, 16 per cent used marijuana and were past-smokers, five per cent were past-smokers and 4% only smoked cigarettes. The average duration of marijuana use was 11.5 years.

Marijuana users had a higher risk of dying from hypertension. Compared to non-users, marijuana users had a 3.42-times higher risk of death from hypertension and a 1.04 greater risk for each year of use. There was no association between marijuana use and death from heart disease or cerebrovascular disease.

“We found that marijuana users had a greater than three-fold risk of death from hypertension and the risk increased with each additional year of use,” Yankey said.

Lack of awareness leading India towards breast cancer epidemic

Lack of early diagnosis is leading India towards a breast cancer epidemic, according to scientists who suggest that educating men may be key to encouraging women to seek help earlier. The research, which is the first of its kind to look at breast cancer awareness in India, found that cultural and religious issues mean that women do not access health services, are reluctant to consult male doctors, neglect their own health due to family obligations and are over-dependent on other family members to seek medical help, all of which causes delay in diagnosis.

Researchers at University of Portsmouth in the UK found that traditional marketing campaigns do not work for raising awareness of the disease and that community nurses are the most effective channel. These community nurses, who are trusted in the community and by male members in the family, represent one of the best channels of fostering a greater understanding by men about early symptoms and diagnosis.

The research highlights the significance of the country’s rapid economic development, leading to greater urbanisation, which is leading some women towards a western lifestyle resulting in a rise of breast cancer rates. It describes the issue as one of the biggest health threats facing India today. In India’s cities and urban areas, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed type of cancer among women, researchers said.

As many as 70,218 Indian women died of breast cancer in 2012 and deaths from the disease are predicted to increase to 76,000 in 2020 with an average age of incidence shifting to 30 years from 50 years, they said. Yet women seek medical care extremely late due to lack of awareness about self-examination and cultural barriers. Judith Fletcher-Brown, from the University of Portsmouth, interviewed several women by email about their experiences in order to elicit the most open answers to her questions.

breast cancer, breast cancer india, breast cancer awareness, One participant said that even among friends they are too shy, although there is more openness between mothers and daughters. “India is still a patriarchal society and while women are now in responsible jobs and earning for their families, it’s the men who are still the head of the household,” said Fletcher-Brown.

“Even educated professional women do not discuss private matters about their bodies with their husbands, fathers or brothers so it’s essential to direct health messages towards men to increase their awareness of and willingness to discuss the problem,” she said.

Researchers found that community health nurses had the greatest impact in raising awareness of early breast cancer symptoms with both men and women. These Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs) are embedded in the community and are far more effective than national advertising campaigns in overcoming cultural barriers because they have the trust of husbands and fathers as well as the women at risk.

The study showed that schools are the second best channel through which to raise awareness in young women, and in third place was the media, which has seen some success in raising awareness through charity initiatives in the country. Traditional marketing campaigns were one of the least effective channels.

Less sleep may increase diabetes risk in children, says study

Parents, take note! Children who do not get enough night sleep are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, a study warns. Researchers at St George’s University of London in the UK analysed the body measurements, blood sample results and questionnaire data from 4,525 children of multi-ethnic descent, aged 9 to 10 years, in the UK. They found that children who slept longer had lower body weight and lower levels of fat mass. Sleep duration was also inversely related to insulin, insulin resistance and blood glucose.

The National Health Service (NHS) in the UK recommends a sleep duration of 10 hours for a 10 year old.

less sleep news, health news, lifestyle news, indian express news“These findings suggest increasing sleep duration could offer a simple approach to reducing levels of body fat and type 2 diabetes risk from early life,” said Christopher G Owen, professor at St George’s University of London.

“Potential benefits associated with increased sleep in childhood may have implications for health in adulthood,” he said.

Increasing the mean weekday sleep duration (10.5 hours) by half an hour could be associated with a 0.1 kilogramme per square metre lower body mass index (BMI) and a 0.5 per cent reduction in insulin resistance, researchers said.

Reducing these levels may have longer-term implications for reduced type 2 diabetes in later life, they added.